Afrosnhoezzzz

shegreentea:

searchin4food:

carrrrramelwax:

ondistantshores:

janemba:

soujaboymeetsworld:

jackanthonyfernandez:

thechanelmuse:

Meet Cory Nieves. He’s a dapper, 10-year old CEO of Mr. Cory’s Cookies who started his own booming cookie business in an effort to help his mom buy a car after moving from NYC to New Jersey in 2009.

!!!!!! COOKIE CEO !!!!!!!

this is the best post on tumblr ever!!!

What the fuck

I will never be cooler than this guy.

I can’t help but reblog this every time I see it.

I aspire to be this dapper

He’s so fancy. Yaaas 10 year old black CEO, YAAAAASSS

whatismgmt:

Do u ever wanna punch urself in the face for procrastinating and ruining ur life

radsturbate:

marry someone who has a different favorite cereal than u so they wont eat all of urs

the-goddamazon:

tactical-honey-badgers-dont-die:

steampunksteampunk:

Steampunk prosthesis with gears activated by movement.
By Christopher Snell via sizvideos

oh shit. This is fucking rad.

That shit is fire.

ganjflavoredcleats:

nokiabae:

"WHITEWASH" a Documentary On The Black Experience In Surfing

Whitewash explores the African-American experience and race in surfing. It touches on some pertinent issues about how the history of surfing was detached from it’s indigenous Hawaiian origins and largely regarded as having it’s founding or “discovery” with European settlers. It also focuses on the issues of segregation and racism at beaches in California and of how the belief that “black people can’t swim” was passed down from generation to generation. 

I’m so glad this documentary exists. There is also great evidence of sea culture in West Africa which after the slave trade forced the people to move inland. Surfing has never been a white-trait. 

Seen it fucking awesome highly recommend

ganjflavoredcleats:

nokiabae:

"WHITEWASH" a Documentary On The Black Experience In Surfing

Whitewash explores the African-American experience and race in surfing. It touches on some pertinent issues about how the history of surfing was detached from it’s indigenous Hawaiian origins and largely regarded as having it’s founding or “discovery” with European settlers. It also focuses on the issues of segregation and racism at beaches in California and of how the belief that “black people can’t swim” was passed down from generation to generation. 

I’m so glad this documentary exists. There is also great evidence of sea culture in West Africa which after the slave trade forced the people to move inland. Surfing has never been a white-trait. 

Seen it fucking awesome highly recommend

loveniaimani:


gladi8rs:

soulbrotherv2:

This has got to be the picture of the day!
Original caption:  Before graduation… My Grandpa 95 Years old & still strong!! God bless him.  (I didn’t know how to tie a tie.) 

Beautiful…

Love.

loveniaimani:

gladi8rs:

soulbrotherv2:

This has got to be the picture of the day!

Original caption:  Before graduation… My Grandpa 95 Years old & still strong!! God bless him.  (I didn’t know how to tie a tie.) 

Beautiful…

Love.

jean-luc-gohard:

The most dangerous thing society teaches boys and men, especially white boys and men, is that their emotions are objective logic and reason and that anyone who disagrees is being irrational.

okayafrica:

VIDEO:Introducing French Afro-Cuban Twin Sisters Ibeyi & Their Yoruba Doom Soul

Ibeyi, made up of Cuban-born, Paris-based twin sisters Naomi and Lisa-Kaindé Díaz, is an electronic doom soul duo who are forging a new spiritual sound with their debut EP Oya. The 19-year-old musicians are XL Recordings‘ newest signees, and their introductory singles “Oya” and “River” possess a hypnotic blend of hip-hop, electronica, and blues infused with Yoruba prayers and folk songs that will transport you to a higher realm upon first listen.

Singing in French, English, Spanish and Yoruba, Ibeyi count among their primary influences Nina Simone, Meshell Ndegeocello, James Blake and their late father, the celebrated Cuban jazz percussionist Miguel “Anga” Diaz. Ibeyi’s vocal range, which wavers from the raspy and wraith-like to the sonorous and divine, is ideal for their sonic palette which revels in the phantasmagorical groove of liturgical Yoruba songs. Besides singing in Yoruba–which was brought to Cuba by West African slaves–Ibeyi honor their father’s legacy and Afro-Cuban heritage through their percussive production and use of live instruments. Beatsmith Naomi plays both the cajón and the batá while Lisa-Kaindé remains more in tune with the musical mythos of Ibeyi’s sound by weaving Yoruba lore deeply into their lyrics. “River” is dedicated to the goddess Oshun (the mother of the Ibeyi, and their first single and EP are both named for  Oya (the benevolent orisha who took the Ibeyi in after Oshun was accused of witchcraft for birthing twins and kicked them out).

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sosa-parks:

If I really like you then nobody else getting the same attention